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FBI Sting Nabs Crooked Philadelphia Judge

addictinginfo:

FBI Sting Nabs Crooked Philadelphia Judge

How Far Should The FBI Go In A Sting? Photo Credit: FBI Undercover Agent http://www.glogster.com/gio01/fbi/g-6mc23j5cj87v1sj1akr4ka0

How Far Should The FBI Go In A Sting?
Photo Credit: FBI Undercover Agent
http://www.glogster.com/gio01/fbi/g-6mc23j5cj87v1sj1akr4ka0

Someone’s following you? Well, actually they might be doing just that. For example the FBI wanted to drop a net on Judge Joseph Waters, Jr. a Philadelphia municipal judge, but they couldn’t prove he was corrupt.

In order to catch him in the act, they invented a whole…

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John Oliver Asks - Ayn Rand, How Is She Still A Thing? (VIDEO)

addictinginfo:

John Oliver Asks – Ayn Rand, How Is She Still A Thing? (VIDEO)

AYN_RAND

There is a large group within the right-wing within this country which is absolutely adored with the work of Russian immigrant Ayn Rand. They make bad movies based on her books despite a failure of critical acclaim or box office performance, try to force her books into school curriculum, even try launching whole communities based on her work which then go bust almost immediately. And, as Last…

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rtamerica:

US, coalition fighter jets bomb grain silos killing civilians in Syria - watchdog group
US-led coalition airstrikes destroyed grain silos and other targets in parts of northern and eastern Syria dominated by Islamic State, killing civilians while only wounding ISIS fighters, according to an organization monitoring war in Syria.
The overnight bombings hit mills and grain storage facilities in Manbij, a militant-held town in northern Syria. Coalition forces possibly mistook the structures for Islamic State holdings, said the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights on Monday. 

rtamerica:

US, coalition fighter jets bomb grain silos killing civilians in Syria - watchdog group

US-led coalition airstrikes destroyed grain silos and other targets in parts of northern and eastern Syria dominated by Islamic State, killing civilians while only wounding ISIS fighters, according to an organization monitoring war in Syria.

The overnight bombings hit mills and grain storage facilities in Manbij, a militant-held town in northern Syria. Coalition forces possibly mistook the structures for Islamic State holdings, said the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights on Monday. 

diebythegun:

The bad guys aren’t always who you think and they’re not always bad, they’re just sometimes dumb.

Lorde gave me the best birthday present in the world and released a new song today!

thepeoplesrecord:

The Ferguson protests aren’t over. Here’s why they picked up again this week
September 29, 2014

A desecrated memorial and comments from a police chief this week brought the simmering tensions between the black residents of Ferguson, Missouri, and local law enforcement to a boil once again, sparking an escalation in protests in the St. Louis suburb during the past several days.

These latest protests were the largest and most volatile since the initial demonstrations that took place for several weeks after Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson shot unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brownon August 9. The first few weeks of protests, which played out through much of August, captured national media attention as demonstrators took to the streets to speak out against what many saw as a history of discrimination by the local government and police against the black community.

Throughout most of September, the tensions appeared to die down. But a couple of events this week, starting with a burned memorial to Brown, were enough to reinvigorate the protests, indicating that the underlying issues and racial tensions in Ferguson are far from resolved.

A desecrated memorial and comments from a police chief this week brought the simmering tensions between the black residents of Ferguson, Missouri, and local law enforcement to a boil once again, sparking an escalation in protests in the St. Louis suburb during the past several days.

These latest protests were the largest and most volatile since the initial demonstrations that took place for several weeks after Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson shot unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brownon August 9. The first few weeks of protests, which played out through much of August, captured national media attention as demonstrators took to the streets to speak out against what many saw as a history of discrimination by the local government and police against the black community.

Throughout most of September, the tensions appeared to die down. But a couple of events this week, starting with a burned memorial to Brown, were enough to reinvigorate the protests, indicating that the underlying issues and racial tensions in Ferguson are far from resolved.

Some residents suggested to St. Louis TV station KSDK that the fire was intentional. “We know it wasn’t an accident,” one protester told KSDK. “You know how many people live over there that seen it from the beginning? I mean it’s just a big old flame. You could tell the way it was set.”

The ensuing protests at Canfield and West Florissant streets, where much of the initial demonstrations took place, at times got violent. CNN reported five arrests after people threatened police with gunshots, rocks, and bottles, and one person reportedly threw a Molotov cocktail at a parking structure. Two officers were injured, and one business was broken into, Missouri Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson told media.

Perhaps in response to the Tuesday protest, Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson, in a video posted Thursday, recognized several of his police department’s mistakes in the aftermath of the shooting. The apology was long sought by the Brown family and protesters.

Jackson apologized to the Brown family for keeping Brown’s body in the street for hours as officers investigated the scene. He also acknowledged the feelings of distrust toward the police within Ferguson’s black community, and he appeared to express some regret for how police, which at first responded with a militarized presence to largely peaceful demonstrators, handled the protests.

"The right of the people to peacefully assemble is what the police are here to protect," he said. "If anyone who was peacefully exercising that right is upset and angry, I feel responsible, and I’m sorry."

But the day before, on Wednesday, Jackson told CNN that police will continue using riot gear if the situation escalates. “We cannot have nights like last night,” he said “We can’t have actions like last night that can result in injury or death. Those will not be tolerated.”

In another interview with CNN, Jackson also said that, despite his mistakes, he will not step down. “I’ve talked to a lot of people who have initially called for [my resignation] and then have changed their mind after having meetings and discussions about moving forward,” Jackson said. “Realistically, I’m going to stay here and see this through. You know, this is mine, and I’m taking ownership of it.”

Demonstrators appeared to take Jackson’s video apology as too little, too late. They again took to the streets on Thursday night and the weekend, some reportedly demanding that the police chief resign. Despite Jackson’s attempt to march with protesters on Thursday night, the situation once again escalated into violent clashes and arrests.

Full article

addictinginfo:

Conservatives Try To Make Their Own ‘Ice Bucket Challenge’ With Guns, Flags, And The Bible (PHOTOS)

american-challenge-photo1

Image via Facebook

This summer, seemingly everyone you had ever met began taking the “Ice Bucket Challenge” and uploading the results to social media. The rules were simple: donate money…

thinksquad:

An Air Force staff sergeant who pleaded guilty to rape charges will receive a new sentence, after a military appeals court decided there was not enough evidence to sustain the sexual assault conviction.
A three-judge panel of Air Force judges upheld other charges for Eddy Soto, a former trainer at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas, but ruled that his original sentence of four years of confinement and a dishonorable discharge should be thrown out. A lower court will re-sentence Soto on charges of adultery, violating a lawful regulation and falsifying an official statement.
Soto admitted to having relationships with five women in 2011 but insisted that he was innocent of sexual assault.
Lackland Air Force Base was the site of widespread sexual misconduct scandals in the past several years, with more than 30 instructors convicted of preying on more than 60 victims. But despite outrage over sky-high rates of sexual assault in the military, rape convictions connected to the Lackland scandal were extremely rare.
http://www.msnbc.com/msnbc/military-overturns-lackland-air-force-base-rape-conviction

thinksquad:

An Air Force staff sergeant who pleaded guilty to rape charges will receive a new sentence, after a military appeals court decided there was not enough evidence to sustain the sexual assault conviction.

A three-judge panel of Air Force judges upheld other charges for Eddy Soto, a former trainer at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas, but ruled that his original sentence of four years of confinement and a dishonorable discharge should be thrown out. A lower court will re-sentence Soto on charges of adultery, violating a lawful regulation and falsifying an official statement.

Soto admitted to having relationships with five women in 2011 but insisted that he was innocent of sexual assault.

Lackland Air Force Base was the site of widespread sexual misconduct scandals in the past several years, with more than 30 instructors convicted of preying on more than 60 victims. But despite outrage over sky-high rates of sexual assault in the military, rape convictions connected to the Lackland scandal were extremely rare.

http://www.msnbc.com/msnbc/military-overturns-lackland-air-force-base-rape-conviction